Coin collecting, coin commentary, coin images, and coin values for the passionate and the not-so-passionate coin collector

Coin Values and Coin Commentary

What is in the name?

Coin Finder 1

Coin Finder 2

(1986-Present) American Gold Eagle Coin

CoinTrapTM Commentary: Of all the coins to be admired, none quite measure up to the American Gold Eagle. Remarkable.  Enduring. Symbolic.  Timeless. These are just a few of the words that come to mind when pondering the beauty of this coin. The American Gold Eagle is guaranteed by the United States government to contain 1 troy ounce of of fine gold for the $50 face value version, 1/2 troy ounce of fine gold for the $25 face value version, 1/4 troy ounce of fine gold for the $10 face value version, and 1/10 troy ounce of fine gold for the $5 face value version. Of course, the market price of each of these coins far exceeds their respective face value. To improve strength and wear-resistance, the 1 troy ounce version contains, for example, 91.67 % (22 karat) of gold, which forms an amalgam with a trace amount of silver and copper to enhance the strength and wear-resistance of the coin. Naturally, gold coins, including the American Gold Eagle, are fairly expensive to own. However, you do not have to fork over a bundle for the 1 ounce version.  Consider acquiring the 1/10 ounce version, which is more affordable than its larger siblings, and still gives you the bragging rights of owning an American Gold Eagle! 

The obverse of the American Gold Eagle coin is based on an original design by famed artist Augustus Saint-Gaudens, showing a strident Lady Liberty, torch in one hand, and an olive branch in the other hand.  Augustus Saint-Gaudens is also known for his extensive sculptures depicting Civil War generals. His work can be seen in New York City, as well as Chicago. I suggest adding these monuments to your "must see" list, purchasing airline tickets, and going to see the astounding work preserved in the nations greatest cities.  Augustus Saint-Gaudens died in 1907. The reverse side of the American Gold Eagle was designed by Miley Frances Busiek and portrays a family of eagles--signifying family tradition and unity.

Coin Value: What is the value of your American Gold Eagle coin? As with most things, it all depends. The American Gold Eagle coin worth or value depends on these main factors: (1) your coin’s grade, (2) whether it is a proof coin (Deep Cameo or DCAM) having a mirror-like polished finish, (3) whether it is a ”first strike” version, (4) whether it is the 1 ounce, the 1/2 ounce, the 1/4 ounce, or the 1/10 ounce version, and (5) scarcity/demand. Regarding your coin’s grade, it has become a standard in the field of numismatics (coin collecting) to grade coins on a point-scale from 1 (poor) to 70 (perfect). This is also referred to as the “Mint State” or just “MS” for short. Click here to find the up-to-date estimated value of your American Gold Eagle coin from the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS®), which takes the factors mentioned above into account*. If you do not know the grade of your American Gold Eagle coin, you can take it to your local coin dealer and ask that they have it graded at one of the three major coin grading services.

American Gold Eagle Coin Mint Years: 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

The U.S. Mint did not produce proof versions of the American Gold Eagle in 2009 due to unprecedented demand of the bullion 2009 American Gold Eagle.

American Gold Eagle - Obverse

American Gold Eagle - Reverse

Obverse - American Gold Eagle Coin

Designer: Augustus Saint Gaudens

Reverse - American Gold Eagle Coin

Designer: Miley Frances Busiek

United States Mint images. CoinTrap.com is not affiliated with the United States Government in any way. Click here for terms and conditions.

      SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE

         This Act may be cited as the “Gold Bullion Coin Act of 1985”.

      Sec. 2. Minting Gold Bullion Coins

         (a) Section 5112(a) of the title 31, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end thereof the following new paragraphs:

             “(7) A fifty dollar gold coin that is 32.7 millimeters in diameter, weighs 33.931 grams, and contains one troy ounce of fine gold.
             “(8) A twenty-five dollar gold coin that is 27.0 millimeters in diameter, weighs 16.996 grams, and contains one-half troy ounce of fine gold.
             “(9) A ten dollar gold coin that is 22.0 millimeters in diameter, weighs 8.483 grams, and contains one-fourth troy ounce of fine gold.
             “(10) A five dollar gold coin that is 16.5 millimeters in diameter, weighs 3.393 grams, and contains one-tenth troy ounce of fine gold.

         (b) Section 5112 of title 31, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end thereof the following new subsection:

             “(i)(1) Notwithstanding section 5111 (a)(1) of this title, the Secretary shall mint and issue the gold coins described in paragraphs (7), (8), (9), and (10) of subsection (a) of this section, in quantities sufficient to meet public demand, and such gold coins shall

                 “(A) have a design determined by the Secretary, except that the fifty dollar gold coin shall have-

                     “(i) on the obverse side, a design symbolic of Liberty; and
                     “(ii) on the reverse side, a design representing a family of eagles, with the male carrying an olive branch and flying above a nest containing a female eagle and hatchlings;

                 “(B) have inscriptions of the denomination, the weight of the fine gold content, the year of minting or issuance, and the words ‘Liberty’, ‘In God We Trust’, ‘United States of America’, and ‘E Pluribus Unum’, and
                 “(C) have reeded edges.

             “(2)(A) The Secretary shall sell the coins minted under this subsection to the public at a price equal to the market value of the bullion at the time of sale, plus the cost of minting, marketing, and distributing such coins (including labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, and promotional and overhead expenses).

                 “(B) The Secretary shall make bulk sales of the coins minted under this subsection at a reasonable discount.

             “(3) For purposes of section 5132(a)(1) of this title, all coins minted under this subsection shall be considered to be numismatic items”.

         (c) Section 5116(a) of title 31, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end thereof the following:

             “(3) The Secretary shall acquire gold for the coins issued under section 5112(i) of this title by purchase of gold mined from natural deposits in the United States, or in a territory or possession of the United States, within one year after the month in which the ore from which it is derived was mined. The Secretary shall pay not more than the average world price for the gold. In the absence of available supplies of such gold at the average world price, the Secretary may use gold from reserves held by the United States to mint the coins issued under section 5112(i) of this title. The Secretary shall issue such regulations as may be necessary to carry out this paragraph”.

         (d) Section 5118(b) of title 31, United States Code, is amended-

             (1) in the first sentence, by striking out “or deliver”; and
             (2) in the second sentence, by inserting “(other than gold and silver coins)” before “that may be lawfully held”.

         (e) The third sentence of section 5132(a)(1) of title 31, United States Code, is amended by striking out “minted under section 5112(a) of this title” and inserting in lieu thereof “minted under paragraphs (1) through (6) of section 5112(a) of this title”.

         (f) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, an amount equal to the amount by which the proceeds from the sale of the coins issued under section 5112(i) of title 31, United States Code, exceed the sum of-

             (1) the cost of minting, marketing, and distributing such coins, and
             (2) the value of gold certificates (not exceeding forty-two and two-ninths dollars a fine troy ounce) retired from the use of gold contained in such coins, shall be deposited in the general fund of the Treasury and shall be used for the sole purpose of reducing the national debt.

         (g) The Secretary shall take all actions necessary to ensure that the issuance of the coins minted under Section 5112(i) of title 31, United States Code, shall result in no net cost to the United States Government.

      Sec 3. Effective Date

         This Act shall take effect on October 1, 1985 except that no coins may be issued or sold under section 5112(i) of title 31, United States Code, before October 1, 1986.


      Approved December 17, 1985.

      Legislative History

         * S. 1639
         * CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, Vol. (1985):
               considered and passed House.
               considered and passed Senate.
       

* CoinTrapTM is not affiliated with the PCGS®.  By clicking on the link above, you are opening a browser window containing content provided by a third party website and you will be subject to any terms and conditions as set forth on that website.

More Coin Mint Years

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

1996

1995

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

1989

1988

1987

1986

1985

1984

1983

1982

(1972 - 1981)

(1962 - 1971)

(1952 - 1961)

(1942 - 1951)

(1932 - 1941)

(1922 - 1931)

(1912 - 1921)

(1902 - 1911)

 

 

Back to CoinTrapTM Main Page

[Coin Collecting, Coin Values, and Coin Commentary | CoinTrap.com] [Coin Trap Name] [Links] [Terms] [Contact Us]

Copyright © 2009 - 2017. All rights reserved.

Coin Collecting, Coin Commentary and Coin Values