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2008 Bald Eagle Gold Coin

CoinTrapTM Commentary: With a maximum mintage of 100,000, there are limited numbers of the Bald Eagle Gold Coins that are currently in the hands of collectors.  The obverse of the coin shows two young eaglets resting on a branch in their natural habitat. Although at one time a rare sight, the Bald Eagle population has recovered to the point that it no longer needs the protection of the Endangered Species Act--but other protections are still in place.  On the reverse, the current Great Seal of the United States of America is displayed in all of its glory. While the 2008 Bald Eagle Commemorative Gold Coin has a nominal face value of $5, the actual market price is of course much higher than five dollars.

Coin Value: What is the value of your 2008 Bald Eagle Gold coin?  Well, that depends. The 2008 Bald Eagle Gold coin worth or value depends on these main factors: (1) your coin’s grade, (2) whether it is a proof coin (Deep Cameo or DCAM) having a mirror-like polished finish, and (3) scarcity/demand.  Regarding your coin’s grade, it has become a standard in the field of numismatics (coin collecting) to grade coins on a point-scale from 1 (poor) to 70 (perfect).  This is also referred to as the “Mint State” or just “MS” for short.  Click here to look for the up-to-date estimated value of your 2008 American Bald Eagle gold coin from the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS®), which takes the factors mentioned above into account*. If you do not know the grade of your 2008 Bald Eagle Gold coin, you can take it to your local coin dealer and ask that they have it graded at one of the three major coin grading services.

2008 Bald Eagle $5 - Obverse

2008 Bald Eagle $5 - Reverse

Obverse - 2008 Bald Eagle Gold Coin

Designer: Susan Gamble
Sculptor: Phebe Hemphill

Reverse - 2008 Bald Eagle Gold Coin

Sculptor: Don Everhart

United States Mint images. CoinTrap.com is not affiliated with the United States Government in any way. Click here for terms and conditions.

    AMERICAN BALD EAGLE RECOVERY AND NATIONAL EMBLEM COMMEMORATIVE COIN ACT

    [[Page 118 STAT. 3934]]

    Public Law 108-486
    108th Congress

                                     An Act

     To require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint coins celebrating the
    recovery and restoration of the American bald eagle, the national symbol
     of the United States, to America's lands, waterways, and skies and the
      great importance of the designation of the American bald eagle as an
    ``endangered'' species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, and for
             other purposes. <<NOTE: Dec. 23, 2004 - [H.R. 4116]>>

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the
    United States of America in Congress <<NOTE: American Bald Eagle
    Recovery and National Emblem Commemorative Coin Act. 31 USC 5112
    note.>> assembled,

    SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``American Bald Eagle Recovery and
    National Emblem Commemorative Coin Act''.

    SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

       The Congress finds as follows:
               (1) The bald eagle was designated as the national emblem of
           the United States on June 20, 1782, by our country's Founding
           Fathers at the Second Continental Congress.
               (2) The bald eagle is the greatest visible symbol of the
           spirit of freedom and democracy in the world.
               (3) The bald eagle species is unique to North America and
           represents the American values and attributes of freedom,
           courage, strength, spirit, loyalty, justice, equality,
           democracy, quality, and excellence.
               (4) The bald eagle is the central image used in the Great
           Seal of the United States and the seal of many branches and
           departments of the United States Government, including the
           President and the Vice President of the United States, the
           United States Congress, the Department of Defense, the
           Department of the Treasury, the Department of Justice, the
           Department of State, the Department of Commerce, the Department
           of Homeland Security, and the United States Postal Service.
               (5) The bald eagle's image and symbolism have played a
           profound role in establishing and honoring American beliefs and
           traditions.
               (6) The bald eagle's image and symbolism have influenced
           American art, music, history, literature, commerce, and culture
           since the founding of our Nation.
               (7) The bald eagle species was once threatened with possible
           extinction in the lower 48 States but is now making a gradual,
           encouraging recovery within America's lands, waterways, and
           skies.
               (8) The bald eagle was federally classified as an
           ``endangered'' species in 1973 under the Endangered Species Act
           of

    [[Page 118 STAT. 3935]]

           1973, and, in 1995, was removed from the ``endangered'' species
           list and upgraded to the less imperiled ``threatened'' status
           under such Act.
               (9) The administration is likely to officially delist the
           bald eagle from both the ``endangered'' and ``threatened''
           species lists under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 by no
           later than 2008.
               (10) The initial recovery of the bald eagle population in
           the United States was accomplished by the vigilant efforts of
           numerous caring agencies, corporations, organizations, and
           citizens.
               (11) The continued caring and concern of the American people
           and the further restoration and protection of the bald eagle and
           its habitat is necessary to guarantee the full recovery and
           survival of this precious national treasure for future
           generations.
               (12) Since the Endangered Species Act of 1973 requires that
           delisted species be administratively monitored for a 5-year
           period, the bald eagle nests in 49 States will require continual
           monitoring after the bald eagle is removed from the protection
           of such Act; and such efforts will require substantial funding
           to the Federal and State agencies and private organizations that
           will conduct such monitoring.
               (13) Due to Federal and State budget cutting and balancing
           trends, funding for on-going bald eagle care, restoration,
           monitoring, protection, and enhancement programs has diminished
           annually.
               (14) In anticipation of the nationwide observance of the
           official removal, by 2008, of the bald eagle from the
           ``threatened'' species list under the Endangered Species Act of
           1973, and the 35th anniversary, in 2008, of the Endangered
           Species Act of 1973 and the designation of the bald eagle as an
           ``endangered'' species under such Act, Congress wishes to offer
           the opportunity for all persons to voluntarily participate in
           raising funds for future bald eagle recovery, monitoring, and
           preservation efforts and to contribute to a special American
           Eagle Fund endowment managed by the not-for-profit American
           Eagle Foundation of Tennessee in the United States, in
           cooperation with fund management experts.
               (15) It is appropriate for Congress to authorize coins--
                       (A) celebrating the recovery and restoration of the
                   bald eagle, the living symbol of freedom in the United
                   States, to America's lands, waterways, and skies;
                       (B) commemorating the removal of the bald eagle from
                   the ``endangered'' and ``threatened'' species lists
                   under the Endangered Species Act of 1973; and
                       (C) commemorating the 35th anniversary of the
                   enactment of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 and the
                   designation of the bald eagle as an ``endangered''
                   species under such Act.

    SEC. 3. COIN SPECIFICATIONS.

       (a) Denominations.--In celebration of the recovery of the bald
    eagle, the national living symbol of freedom, to America's lands,
    waterways, and skies and in commemoration of the 35th anniversary of the
    enactment of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 and the placement of the
    bald eagle on the endangered species

    [[Page 118 STAT. 3936]]

    list under such Act, the Secretary of the Treasury (hereafter in this
    Act referred to as the ``Secretary'') shall mint and issue the following
    coins:
               (1) $5 gold coins.--Not more than 100,000 $5 coins, which
           shall--
                       (A) weigh 8.359 grams;
                       (B) have a diameter of 0.850 inches; and
                       (C) contain 90 percent gold and 10 percent alloy.
               (2) $1 silver coins.--Not more than 500,000 $1 coins, which
           shall--
                       (A) weigh 26.73 grams;
                       (B) have a diameter of 1.500 inches; and
                       (C) contain 90 percent silver and 10 percent copper.
               (3) Half dollar clad coins.--Not more than 750,000 half
           dollar coins which shall--
                       (A) weigh 11.34 grams;
                       (B) have a diameter of 1.205 inches; and
                       (C) be minted to the specifications for half dollar
                   coins contained in section 5112(b) of title 31, United
                   States Code.

       (b) Legal Tender.--The coins minted under this Act shall be legal
    tender, as provided in section 5103 of title 31, United States Code.
       (c) Numismatic Items.--For purposes of sections 5134 and 5136 of
    title 31, United States Code, all coins minted under this Act shall be
    considered to be numismatic items.

    SEC. 4. DESIGN OF COINS.

       (a) Design Requirements.--
               (1) In general.--The design of the coins minted under this
           Act shall be emblematic of the bald eagle and its history,
           natural biology, and national symbolism.
               (2) Designation and inscriptions.--On each coin minted under
           this Act there shall be--
                       (A) a designation of the value of the coin;
                       (B) an inscription of the year ``2008'' ; and
                       (C) inscriptions of the words ``Liberty'', ``In God
                   We Trust'', ``United States of America'', and ``E
                   Pluribus Unum''.

       (b) Selection.--The design for the coins minted under this Act shall
    be--
               (1) selected by the Secretary after consultation with the
           Commission of Fine Arts, and the American Eagle Foundation of
           Tennessee in the United States; and
               (2) reviewed by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.

    SEC. 5. ISSUANCE OF COINS.

       (a) Quality of Coins.--Coins minted under this Act shall be issued
    in uncirculated and proof qualities.
       (b) Mint Facility.--Only 1 facility of the United States Mint may be
    used to strike any particular quality of the coins minted under this
    Act.
       (c) Period for Issuance.--The Secretary may issue coins minted under
    this Act only during the 1-year period beginning on January 1, 2008.

    SEC. 6. SALE OF COINS.

       (a) Sale Price.--The coins issued under this Act shall be sold by
    the Secretary at a price equal to the sum of--

    [[Page 118 STAT. 3937]]

               (1) the face value of the coins;
               (2) the surcharge provided in section 7(a) with respect to
           such coins; and
               (3) the cost of designing and issuing the coins (including
           labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, overhead expenses,
           marketing, and shipping).

       (b) Bulk Sales.--The Secretary shall make bulk sales of the coins
    issued under this Act at a reasonable discount.
       (c) Prepaid Orders.--
               (1) In general.--The Secretary shall accept prepaid orders
           for the coins minted under this Act before the issuance of such
           coins.
               (2) Discount.--Sale prices with respect to prepaid orders
           under paragraph (1) shall be at a reasonable discount.

    SEC. 7. SURCHARGES.

       (a) In General.--All sales of coins minted under this Act shall
    include a surcharge as follows:
               (1) A surcharge of $35 per coin for the $5 coin.
               (2) A surcharge of $10 per coin for the $1 coin.
               (3) A surcharge of $3 per coin for the half dollar coin.

       (b) Distribution.--Subject to section 5134(f) of title 31, United
    States Code, all surcharges received by the Secretary from the sale of
    coins issued under this Act shall be promptly paid by the Secretary to
    the American Eagle Foundation of Tennessee in the United States to
    further its works.
       (c) Audits.--The American Eagle Foundation of Tennessee in the
    United States and the American Eagle Fund shall be subject to the audit
    requirements of section 5134(f)(2) of title 31, United States Code, with
    regard to the amounts received by the Foundation or the Fund under
    subsection (b).
       (d) Limitation.--Notwithstanding subsection (a), no surcharge may be
    included with respect to the issuance under this Act of any coin during
    a calendar year if, as of the time of such issuance, the issuance of
    such coin would result in the number of commemorative coin programs
    issued during such year to exceed the annual 2 commemorative coin
    program issuance limitation under section 5112(m)(1) of title 31, United
    States Code (as in effect on the

    [[Page 118 STAT. 3938]]

    date of the enactment of this Act). The Secretary of the Treasury may
    issue guidance to carry out this subsection.

       Approved December 23, 2004.

    LEGISLATIVE HISTORY--H.R. 4116:
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, Vol. 150 (2004):
               Dec. 7, considered and passed House.
               Dec. 8, considered and passed Senate.
     

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